Sunday, March 9, 2014

2010, The Who by numbers, paperback

2010, paperback
The Who by numbers 
by Steve Grantley & Alan G. Parker

Being a Who fan I really enjoyed this book. If you are looking for 
the dirt this isn't the book. They mention some instances but 
this is mostly about the music. I really enjoy books of this nature.
They go album by album, track by track.
Even on the reissue CDs they cover the bonus tracks.

There are a few Alice Cooper mentions and one I read on pg 124
that is quoted in Dave Thompson's Welcome To My Nightmare book.



Pg 20

The enduring power of “My Generation” was underlined decades later, when
American shock rocker Alice Cooper told British DJ Ken Bruce on BBC Radio 2
in 2007 that he thought the song should be the new British national anthem. Cooper
described the song as a masterpiece, and its composer as the ultimate rock star.
This one song has so many innovations that it alone would later earn the band a
place in the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame.


Pg 124

"Put The Money Down" on Odds & Sods album
A song originally intended for the Lifehouse project, this was produced by the band
and Glyn Johns at Olympic Studios in June ‘72. Pete praised Johns for the “terrific
sound, beautifully recorded.” Roger’s aggressive vocal is full of brazen, youthful 
exuberance - belying his initial reluctance to get to the studio in time to do it. 
The archive tape of this only had a guide vocal and try as he might, Entwistle 
couldn’t pin down Daltrey to come in and record a new vocal. Exasperated, he sent word 
to Roger to ask if he’d mind if John did the vocals himself. 
Daltrey’s response was swift; he had no problem
with that - as long as John had no problem with Roger doing the bass parts. 
Daltrey turned up at Ramport Studios the next morning.
The line “there are bands killing chickens” is a reference to Alice Cooper’s
supposed propensity for doing this on stage.


Pg 137 - 138

The king of the crazy-makers, Keith Moon had moved to California and was
living it up with various Los Angeles-based celebrities; among them ex-Beatle
Ringo Starr, brilliant but unpredictable singer-songwriter Harry Nilsson, shock-
rocker Alice Cooper and future Dallas star Lany Hagman. They would drink
together in their self-styled “Lair of the Hollywood Vampires”, based at the
Rainbow on Sunset Strip in Los Angeles - a notorious 70s hang out for the idle
rich and famous, where Keith was often the main attraction. Alice Cooper declared 
him to be rock ‘n’ roll royalty.


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